Pipeline

Nosopharm’s anti-infective pipeline focuses on the treatment of infectious diseases, particularly in the context of antimicrobial resistance.

Our lead R&D programs are based on our unique expertise in the biomining of the bacteria Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus.

 Enterobacteriaceae

The main hospital pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family are the bacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These are detected in 20% of the hospital-acquired infections in the EU and the US (Sources: ECDC, CDC). The main antibiotic classes used to treat them are cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The multidrug resistance rates of these pathogens to these various classes have reached some particularly troubling thresholds. In the EU 19% of the K. pneumoniae strains present combined resistances to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. In Greece and Italy, 62% and 34% respectively, of the strains of this same pathogen are resistant to carbapenems, considered as a last-resort antibiotic class (Source: ECDC). Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were given a critical priority by the WHO for the R&D of new antibiotics.
Enterobacteriaceae

The main hospital pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family are the bacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These are detected in 20% of the hospital-acquired infections in the EU and the US (Sources: ECDC, CDC). The main antibiotic classes used to treat them are cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The multidrug resistance rates of these pathogens to these various classes have reached some particularly troubling thresholds. In the EU 19% of the K. pneumoniae strains present combined resistances to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. In Greece and Italy, 62% and 34% respectively, of the strains of this same pathogen are resistant to carbapenems, considered as a last-resort antibiotic class (Source: ECDC). Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were given a critical priority by the WHO for the R&D of new antibiotics.
P. aeruginosa

The hospital pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved in about 10% of the hospital-acquired infections in the EU and the US, with a strong incidence in pneumonia (Sources: ECDC, CDC). The main antibiotic classes used to treat it are piperacillin (alone or in combination with tazobactam), ceftazidime, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The multidrug resistance rates of this pathogen to these various classes have also reached some particularly troubling levels. In the EU, 13% of the P. aeruginosa strains present combined resistances to three classes at least. Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa was given a critical priority for the R&D of new antibiotics by the WHO.
Candida

The main fungal hospital pathogens are the Candida species which are detected in 6% of the hospital-acquired infections in the EU and the US (Sources: ECDC, CDC). Very few antifungal drug classes are available to treat these infections: the azoles, the echinocandins, the polyenes and flucytosine. This is of particular concern since some multidrug-resistant Candida species are rapidly emerging, such as Candida glabrata and Candida auris (Source: CDC)

NOSO-502

NOSO-502 IS NOSOPHARM’S FIRST CLINICAL CANDIDATE IN THE NEW CLASS OF ANTIBIOTICS CALLED ODILORHABDINS AND DISCOVERED  FROM A XENORHABDUS BACTERIA.

NOSO-502 is intended for the treatment of the main hospital-acquired infections caused by the multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae : Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter spp.

NOSO-502 inhibits the bacterial ribosome with a new mechanism of action. It is active against the Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), whatever their profile of carbapenemase production. These pathogens are responsible for severe and life-threatening hospital-acquired infections: the WHO classifies them as critical priority pathogens for which new antibiotics are urgently needed.

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NOSO-2G

NOSO-2G is a second-generation Odilorhabdin antibiotic at early preclinical stage. It is active against Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

These pathogens are responsible for life-threatening respiratory hospital-acquired infections: the WHO classifies them as critical priority pathogens for which new antibiotics are urgently needed. NOSO-2G is intended for the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilation-associated pneumonia (HAP/VAP), including infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens.

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OTHER R&D PROGRAMS

Nosopharm develops other R&D programs in the field of infectious diseases stemming from its Photorhabdus & Xenorhabdus based drug discovery platform. Screening campaigns are on-going to discover novel classes of antifungals for the treatment of invasive candidiasis caused by the emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens such as Candida auris and Candida glabrata.